She Writes and Draws

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It’s almost midnight and I’m still working. 
But I’m drawing pictures of toilet paper, so at least I can say I LOVE WHAT I DO.
…
No, seriously. If you have to be working late, drawing pictures of toilet paper is better than the database nightmare I was wrestling with last week. Of course, this is just a draft (pending the artist’s/my boss’ approval.) I’m moving onto some website stuff, with IT CROWD playing in the background, so I can take a wonderful, carefree day off tomorrow and get some writing done.
[UPDATE]
It got approved and lots of compliments. I think drawing toilet paper may be my new calling in life…

It’s almost midnight and I’m still working. 

But I’m drawing pictures of toilet paper, so at least I can say I LOVE WHAT I DO.

No, seriously. If you have to be working late, drawing pictures of toilet paper is better than the database nightmare I was wrestling with last week. Of course, this is just a draft (pending the artist’s/my boss’ approval.) I’m moving onto some website stuff, with IT CROWD playing in the background, so I can take a wonderful, carefree day off tomorrow and get some writing done.

[UPDATE]

It got approved and lots of compliments. I think drawing toilet paper may be my new calling in life…

Yesterday, I finished my design project for Meghan O’Keefe, a writer and comedienne in NYC. Her sketch comedy group is putting on a show “Dorothy Parker & The Salon of Spirits” on April 15th (go see it if you’re in NYC!). 

This was an incredible project to work on. I loved drawing Dorothy. Not only is she one of my favorite poets/writers, she is also a ton of fun to draw because she looks exactly like her works: droll, sharp, witty and arch.

The skeletons were a lot of fun to draw, too. Honestly, I kept thinking of Disney’s 1929 Silly Symphony “The Skeleton Dance” while drawing them.

Although, the problem with my brain is that I had skeletons on the brain for a couple nights and my subconcious was like, “Hmm. Skeletons, eh? Let’s see what kind of narratives can we come up with to accompany these images…” 

So I had about three nights of weird CBS-style dreams of trying to figure out where the skeletons had come from. 

So now that the project is done, I’m back down to two jobs. As nice as it is not juggling three jobs, I’m a bit sad there isn’t another design project immediately lined up after this. I’m never happier than I am when I’m drawing.

Anyone want to order a custom project from me? ;)

vasantsamudre:

sarahsamudre:

Yesterday, I finished my design project for Meghan O’Keefe, a writer and comedienne in NYC. Her sketch comedy group is putting on a show “Dorothy Parker & The Salon of Spirits” on April 15th (go see it if you’re in NYC!).

This was an incredible project to work on. I loved drawing Dorothy. Not only is she one of my favorite poets/writers, she is also a ton of fun to draw because she looks exactly like her works: droll, sharp, witty and arch.

The skeletons were a lot of fun to draw, too. Honestly, I kept thinking of Disney’s 1929 Silly Symphony “The Skeleton Dance” while drawing them.

Although, the problem with my brain is that I had skeletons on the brain for a couple nights and my subconcious was like, “Hmm. Skeletons, eh? Let’s see what kind of narratives can we come up with to accompany these images…”

So I had about three nights of weird CBS-style dreams of trying to figure out where the skeletons had come from.

So now that the project is done, I’m back down to two jobs. As nice as it is not juggling three jobs, I’m a bit sad there isn’t another design project immediately lined up after this. I’m never happier than I am when I’m drawing.

Anyone want to order a custom project from me? ;)

My wife, master of skeletons and sarcastic Lost Generation writers.

My husband, master of awesome captions.

housingworksbookstore:

Most of you are familiar by now (or should be anyway) with artist Matt Kish’s stunning (and massive) Moby Dick in Pictures: One Drawing for Every Page. We’re thrilled to announce that his next undertaking will be an illustrated edition of Joseph Conrad’s masterpiece, Heart of Darkness. This project–unlike his Moby Dick–will include the the full text alongside 100 of his illustrations. (via Announcing: Matt Kish’s Illustrated Heart of Darkness | Tin House)
OMG OMG OMG AWESOME.

housingworksbookstore:

Most of you are familiar by now (or should be anyway) with artist Matt Kish’s stunning (and massive) Moby Dick in Pictures: One Drawing for Every Page. We’re thrilled to announce that his next undertaking will be an illustrated edition of Joseph Conrad’s masterpiece, Heart of Darkness. This project–unlike his Moby Dick–will include the the full text alongside 100 of his illustrations. (via Announcing: Matt Kish’s Illustrated Heart of Darkness | Tin House)

OMG OMG OMG AWESOME.

I got up this morning, stumbled out into the kitchen and began to boil water for tea, fumble about with the beginnings of breakfast, and I started whimpering. Once things began cooking on the stove, I wandered back into the bedroom and nudged Vasant awake.

Me: Meep.Vasant: What’s wrong?Me: Oh, I woke up all whimpery. I’m just really tired.Vasant: Tired like a fox?Me: No, like a bear. Bears aren’t even up yet. A bear is like, “Dude, it’s only March o’clock.”Vasant: You’re right then. You’re tired like a bear (he rolls over and goes back to bed).

I laughed and pushed him before going back out to the kitchen to tend to breakfast, already beginning to plan out a bear clock in my head. As soon as I finished eating and got a bit of work out of the way, I scribbled it out. So here it is. It’s March o’clock and that means it’s still too early to be up and about. 
But it’s never too early to draw stupid comics about things you say before coffee.

I got up this morning, stumbled out into the kitchen and began to boil water for tea, fumble about with the beginnings of breakfast, and I started whimpering. Once things began cooking on the stove, I wandered back into the bedroom and nudged Vasant awake.

Me: Meep.
Vasant: What’s wrong?
Me: Oh, I woke up all whimpery. I’m just really tired.
Vasant: Tired like a fox?
Me: No, like a bear. Bears aren’t even up yet. A bear is like, “Dude, it’s only March o’clock.”
Vasant: You’re right then. You’re tired like a bear (he rolls over and goes back to bed).

I laughed and pushed him before going back out to the kitchen to tend to breakfast, already beginning to plan out a bear clock in my head. As soon as I finished eating and got a bit of work out of the way, I scribbled it out. So here it is. It’s March o’clock and that means it’s still too early to be up and about. 

But it’s never too early to draw stupid comics about things you say before coffee.

From Jim Kruger/Alex Ross’ JUSTICE. (Taken with instagram)

Vasant and I were up until 3 a.m. reading last night. He finally finished Catching Fire and I read Alex Ross’ Justice. 

Any Alex Ross comic is worth reading for the sheer beauty of his art. He is the Norman Rockwell of the superhero scene. But this story is very gripping as well: all the world’s villains, united by a common recurring dream, turn over a new leaf to become the heroes they think Earth deserves… and to rid it of its old heroes. The Justice League has to work together like never before not just to defeat their once and future enemies, but to work out what really creates and keeps a hero honest: suffering.

The writing is beautiful, the action never lets up and again, the art is just staggering. If you get a chance, I definitely recommend reading this.

From Jim Kruger/Alex Ross’ JUSTICE. (Taken with instagram)

Vasant and I were up until 3 a.m. reading last night. He finally finished Catching Fire and I read Alex Ross’ Justice.

Any Alex Ross comic is worth reading for the sheer beauty of his art. He is the Norman Rockwell of the superhero scene. But this story is very gripping as well: all the world’s villains, united by a common recurring dream, turn over a new leaf to become the heroes they think Earth deserves… and to rid it of its old heroes. The Justice League has to work together like never before not just to defeat their once and future enemies, but to work out what really creates and keeps a hero honest: suffering.

The writing is beautiful, the action never lets up and again, the art is just staggering. If you get a chance, I definitely recommend reading this.