She Writes and Draws

Scroll to Info & Navigation

Tag Results

9 posts tagged thor

Closeup of Måne, chased by wolves Closeup of Sol, chased by wolves The three norns by Urd's Well Odin sacrificing his eye in Mime's Well

tinasol:

This is an illustration I did of the Nine Worlds from Norse mythology for my maps project. I wanted to do a simple, informative map because I was baffled by how little most people know about it compared to Greek/Roman/Egyptian mythology.

The descriptions about how the worlds are set up are quite contradictory or logically impossible, so it’s really up to each individual how they want to interpret and render them. Some theorizes it as a flat island world (with an inner, middle and outer circle), or (as a certain Marvel comic does it;) a mush of dimensions with aliens and stuff. I’ve always imagined it as a giant tree whenever we had story time in elementary school, so I tried to fit all the named places I could find strictly into a tree. Also, the tree has its presence and is the centre in most of the worlds, so I solved that by putting a tree within a tree within a tree - Yggdraception!

Explanation: 

Yggdrasil is the world tree. Its branches stretch across the sky and its evergreen leaves covers the world. At the very top of the tree, there’s a golden eagle by the name of Vidofnir, and between his eyes sits the hawk, Verfolne. The pair looks out towards the world. Yggdrasil has three rots, each going down their own wells.

One goes down to Kverghjelme, a well in Niflheim. The root is gnawed on by the serpent Nidhogg, in hopes that it will one day kill Yggdrasil and the world(s) with it. Another goes to Urd’s well in Åsgard, which is tended by three norns (destiny-thread goddesses). In the well lives two golden swans. The water here is so pure and holy, it’s white (but I still coloured it blue!). The third root goes to Mime’s Well in Jotunheim. It is guarded by the wise god Mime, who got beheaded but his head is still there giving advice to gods. This place is also where Odin sacrificed his eye for wisdom. 

A squirrel, Ratatosk, relayes gossip and insults between Nidhogg and Vidofnir. There’s also four deers I forgot to draw in but they don’t do much than eat the leaves. 

I split the world into four sections:

At the top section is Åsgard, the world of the Aesir gods. Here is Valhall, the banquet hall of the gods and warriors, and Folkvang, Freya’s house, where she lives with her own hand-picked warriors (who are more honorable and less bloodthirsty than those who live in Valhall). I’ve also put in the homes of the gods that were given by name, like Bilskirne (Thor’s house), Breidablik (Baldur’s house) and so on.

The only way to get to the other worlds is by Bifrost, the rainbow bridge, which is guarded by Heimdall, from his home in Himmelberget.

In the upper-mid section is Alvheim, land of the elves. The fertility god, Frey, lives here as their ruler. There’s also Vanaheim, the land of the Vanir gods, who specialize in fertility/farming/etc. but not much is known about them.  

Midgard is the human world and lies in the centre of the three. It is surrounded by the world sea and the gigantic Midgard serpent which bites its own tail.  

In the east is Jotunheimen, the land of the giants. I imagine it as a very mountainous terrain. Utgård lies here, which is where the wolf Fenris is being tied.

In the south, is Muspelheim, the land of fire.

In the west, lies Svartalvheim, the land of dark elves and dwarves. 

And in the north, lies Niflheim, the land of ice and mist.

Helheim, the land of the dead lies below/within Niflheim. I drew it as an underground realm under Kverghjelme. Everyone who died outside of battle gets sent here, regardless of how good/bad they were when they were alive, but criminals would be put in Nåstrand, a house by the corpse river. 

I just totally realised I forgot to include an explanation with my assignment, d’oh.

I used the Norwegian names instead of the Norse/Icelandic ones because that’s how I know them as and is a lot more relatable to me (ek snakkur ikkur islendur!) and the descriptions are in English, but there’s a full Norwegian version around somewhere…! 

Sources: Norrøn Mytologi, Åsgard Web, Noregur.is, Valkyria, NT Shamanism and Wikipedia NO/SE/DK.

I want this as a print. This is beautiful.

(via fuckyeahillustrativeart)

Just to reiterate, now that I’m rested and have my feet firmly planted in the next day:
This movie is the best comic book movie done yet. It is as vast and wondrous as the Marvel Universe is in its comics. Never before has that been done on screen this well. It completely shatters the Nolan-esque concept of rooting your heroes in the real world, which I’m a fan of, but it certainly has constrained comic movies as well.The Avengers celebrates the Jack Kirby imagination and yet also makes it tangible and engrossing.
One of its biggest successes: it did justice to The Hulk in a way that’s never been done on screen. Mark Ruffalo avoids the trap that Norton and Bana fell into and, instead of playing Banner like a sadsack scientist/refugee, plays Bruce with a strength, a bitterness and a nobility that blew me away. And The Hulk himself… truly terrifying. 
Also, this would be Loki’s film if the writing weren’t so amazing. Tom Hiddleston outdoes himself and his performance in Thor in ever single scene. From his tears to his smirks to his rage… it doesn’t matter how prepared you think you are for his great acting, you will be blown away. 
And like I said, it’s the great writing and acting that keeps this from being Loki’s film. Any other writer or director may not have been enough to keep the audience from all signing up to be part of Loki’s evil army. But Downey Jr., Evans, Ruffalo and Hemsworth are so committed to their characters and the dialogue is so intelligent, witty and lively, that you are constantly reminded who you are meant to root for and you can’t help it, no matter how amazing Loki is (which I really can’t overstate).
I will be seeing it again this weekend. And the next.
I’d say a lot more here about scenes and dialogue I loved, but I’m going to avoid talking about the plot for a bit until more people have seen it.
Seriously, though, see it soon. Make room in your budgets for extra showings. This film is incredible.

Just to reiterate, now that I’m rested and have my feet firmly planted in the next day:

This movie is the best comic book movie done yet. It is as vast and wondrous as the Marvel Universe is in its comics. Never before has that been done on screen this well. It completely shatters the Nolan-esque concept of rooting your heroes in the real world, which I’m a fan of, but it certainly has constrained comic movies as well.The Avengers celebrates the Jack Kirby imagination and yet also makes it tangible and engrossing.

One of its biggest successes: it did justice to The Hulk in a way that’s never been done on screen. Mark Ruffalo avoids the trap that Norton and Bana fell into and, instead of playing Banner like a sadsack scientist/refugee, plays Bruce with a strength, a bitterness and a nobility that blew me away. And The Hulk himself… truly terrifying. 

Also, this would be Loki’s film if the writing weren’t so amazing. Tom Hiddleston outdoes himself and his performance in Thor in ever single scene. From his tears to his smirks to his rage… it doesn’t matter how prepared you think you are for his great acting, you will be blown away. 

And like I said, it’s the great writing and acting that keeps this from being Loki’s film. Any other writer or director may not have been enough to keep the audience from all signing up to be part of Loki’s evil army. But Downey Jr., Evans, Ruffalo and Hemsworth are so committed to their characters and the dialogue is so intelligent, witty and lively, that you are constantly reminded who you are meant to root for and you can’t help it, no matter how amazing Loki is (which I really can’t overstate).

I will be seeing it again this weekend. And the next.

I’d say a lot more here about scenes and dialogue I loved, but I’m going to avoid talking about the plot for a bit until more people have seen it.

Seriously, though, see it soon. Make room in your budgets for extra showings. This film is incredible.

Tom Hiddleston wrote an amazing article for The Guardian last week in defense of superhero films:

“Superheroes movies like Avengers Assemble should not be scorned”
by Tom Hiddleston for The Guardian
Earlier this year, beneath the wind-whipped tarpaulin of a catering tent in Gloucester, I was working on a film with the actor Malcolm Sinclair. Over scrambled eggs at an ungodly hour, he told me something I had not previously known: when Christopher Reeve was young, barely out of Juilliard, he was roundly mocked by his peers on Broadway for accepting the role of Superman. It was considered an ignoble thing for a classical actor to do.
Since then some of the greatest actors have turned superheroes into a serious business: Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson in Batman;Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart, the first venerable knights of the X-Men, who have now passed the baton to Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy. In spite of 20 years of mercurial work in the likes of Chaplin and Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, it was his rock-star-charismatic yet somehow humble Tony Stark in Iron Man that helped wider audiences finally embrace the enormous talent of Robert Downey Jr. And Heath Ledger's performance in The Dark Knight quite simply changed the game. He raised the bar not just for actors in superhero films, but young actors everywhere; for me. His performance was dark, anarchic, dizzying, free, and totally, thrillingly, dangerous.I grew up watching Superman. As a child, when I first learned to dive into a swimming pool, I wasn't diving, I was flying, like Superman. I used to dream of rescuing a girl I had a crush on (my Lois Lane) from a playground bully (General Zod). Reeve, to my mind, was the first real superhero.
Tom Hiddleston as Loki in Avengers Assemble. Photograph: Zade Rosenthal
Actors in any capacity, artists of any stripe, are inspired by their curiosity, by their desire to explore all quarters of life, in light and in dark, and reflect what they find in their work. Artists instinctively want to reflect humanity, their own and each other’s, in all its intermittent virtue and vitality, frailty and fallibility.
I have never been more inspired than when I watched Harold Pinter speak in a direct address to camera in his Nobel lecture in 2005. “Truth in drama is forever elusive. You never quite find it but the search for it is compulsive. The search is clearly what drives the endeavour. The search is your task. More often than not you stumble upon the truth in the dark, colliding with it or just glimpsing an image or a shape which seems to correspond with the truth, often without realising that you have done so. But the real truth is that there never is any such thing as one truth to be found in dramatic art. There are many. These truths challenge each other, recoil from each other, reflect each other, ignore each other, tease each other, are blind to each other. Some times you feel you have the truth of a moment in your hand, then it slips through your fingers and is lost.”
Big talk for someone in a silly superhero film, I hear you say. But superhero films offer a shared, faithless, modern mythology, through which these truths can be explored. In our increasingly secular society, with so many disparate gods and different faiths, superhero films present a unique canvas upon which our shared hopes, dreams and apocalyptic nightmares can be projected and played out…

(Click here to continue reading ”Superheroes movies like Avengers Assemble should not be scorned” @ The Guardian…)

Tom Hiddleston wrote an amazing article for The Guardian last week in defense of superhero films:

Superheroes movies like Avengers Assemble should not be scorned”

by Tom Hiddleston for The Guardian

Earlier this year, beneath the wind-whipped tarpaulin of a catering tent in Gloucester, I was working on a film with the actor Malcolm Sinclair. Over scrambled eggs at an ungodly hour, he told me something I had not previously known: when Christopher Reeve was young, barely out of Juilliard, he was roundly mocked by his peers on Broadway for accepting the role of Superman. It was considered an ignoble thing for a classical actor to do.

Since then some of the greatest actors have turned superheroes into a serious business: Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson in Batman;Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart, the first venerable knights of the X-Men, who have now passed the baton to Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy. In spite of 20 years of mercurial work in the likes of Chaplin and Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, it was his rock-star-charismatic yet somehow humble Tony Stark in Iron Man that helped wider audiences finally embrace the enormous talent of Robert Downey Jr. And Heath Ledger's performance in The Dark Knight quite simply changed the game. He raised the bar not just for actors in superhero films, but young actors everywhere; for me. His performance was dark, anarchic, dizzying, free, and totally, thrillingly, dangerous.I grew up watching Superman. As a child, when I first learned to dive into a swimming pool, I wasn't diving, I was flying, like Superman. I used to dream of rescuing a girl I had a crush on (my Lois Lane) from a playground bully (General Zod). Reeve, to my mind, was the first real superhero.

Tom Hiddleston in Avengers AssembleTom Hiddleston as Loki in Avengers Assemble. Photograph: Zade Rosenthal

Actors in any capacity, artists of any stripe, are inspired by their curiosity, by their desire to explore all quarters of life, in light and in dark, and reflect what they find in their work. Artists instinctively want to reflect humanity, their own and each other’s, in all its intermittent virtue and vitality, frailty and fallibility.

I have never been more inspired than when I watched Harold Pinter speak in a direct address to camera in his Nobel lecture in 2005. “Truth in drama is forever elusive. You never quite find it but the search for it is compulsive. The search is clearly what drives the endeavour. The search is your task. More often than not you stumble upon the truth in the dark, colliding with it or just glimpsing an image or a shape which seems to correspond with the truth, often without realising that you have done so. But the real truth is that there never is any such thing as one truth to be found in dramatic art. There are many. These truths challenge each other, recoil from each other, reflect each other, ignore each other, tease each other, are blind to each other. Some times you feel you have the truth of a moment in your hand, then it slips through your fingers and is lost.”

Big talk for someone in a silly superhero film, I hear you say. But superhero films offer a shared, faithless, modern mythology, through which these truths can be explored. In our increasingly secular society, with so many disparate gods and different faiths, superhero films present a unique canvas upon which our shared hopes, dreams and apocalyptic nightmares can be projected and played out…

(Click here to continue reading ”Superheroes movies like Avengers Assemble should not be scorned” @ The Guardian…)

An update from FirstShowing.net that is relevant to my people:

Empire recently had a chat with actor Tom Hiddleston and, while he of course did not say a thing about Avengers or the story or any of that, he did mention one worthwhile tidbit - they’re already planning to shoot Thor 2 this summer. “All I know about Thor 2 is that we’re supposed to film it in London in the summer and that it is being directed by Alan Taylor,” he said. Taylor was just announced and the release date is now November 15th, 2013, so they’ve got a bit but they’re looking to get into production by the summer anyway. Keep ‘em coming Marvel!
I’m curious to see how it turns out but there’s not much we can even predict until Avengers arrives. Hiddleston says the same: "I don’t want to spoil anything here. Loki’s eternal predilection is to dance on the fault lines of villainy and redemption. I think whatever happens to him, he’ll always keep people guessing."

Read more Tom Hiddleston Says ‘Thor 2’ Already Starts Shooting This Summer at FirstShowing.net

An update from FirstShowing.net that is relevant to my people:

Empire recently had a chat with actor Tom Hiddleston and, while he of course did not say a thing about Avengers or the story or any of that, he did mention one worthwhile tidbit - they’re already planning to shoot Thor 2 this summer. “All I know about Thor 2 is that we’re supposed to film it in London in the summer and that it is being directed by Alan Taylor,” he said. Taylor was just announced and the release date is now November 15th, 2013, so they’ve got a bit but they’re looking to get into production by the summer anyway. Keep ‘em coming Marvel!

I’m curious to see how it turns out but there’s not much we can even predict until Avengers arrives. Hiddleston says the same: "I don’t want to spoil anything here. Loki’s eternal predilection is to dance on the fault lines of villainy and redemption. I think whatever happens to him, he’ll always keep people guessing."

Read more Tom Hiddleston Says ‘Thor 2’ Already Starts Shooting This Summer at FirstShowing.net